Christmas card

Christmas card apostrophe last name

How do you write your last name on a Christmas card?

Here are a few quick rules:

  1. Never add an apostrophe. Season Greetings from the Smiths.
  2. If your last name ends with “s, x, z, ch, sh”, then add an “es” at the end of your name. Season Greetings from Joneses.
  3. If your last name ends with any other letter, just add an s. Season Greetings from Kranes.

Is it the Smiths or the Smith’s?

The Smiths is plural for “Smith” and means there is more than one person named Smith and the invitation is from them all. When in doubt, we like to use “The Smith Family”. The Smith’s (with an apostrophe before the s) is the possessive of “Smith” and indicates one person ownership.

Is there an apostrophe in last names?

Adding an apostrophe makes the last name possessive, which is unnecessary in this case. Depending on the last letter of the name, simply add –s or –es. … Leave out the apostrophe when making last names plural. For names that do not end in –s, –z, –ch, –sh, or –x, just add –s to the end of the name to make it plural.

How do you pluralize a family name?

Make Your Family Name Plural

For most names, add an -s to make them plural. For names that end in ch, s, sh, x, and z, add -es to make them plural.

How do you sign a Christmas card?

Use a professional closing for all business related greetings. Use a holiday greeting such as “Happy Holidays,” or “Season’s Greetings.” Use a holiday greeting such as “Happy Holidays,” or “Season’s Greetings.” For close family and friends, you can sign the card with your first name or a nickname.

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How do you make a last name possessive?

When it comes to showing possession, to make most surnames possessive, simply add an apostrophe and an “s.” Mr. Smith’s car was repossessed. For showing family possession with surnames that are plural and possessive, make the name plural first by adding an “s” and then add an apostrophe to make them possessive.

What are the 5 examples of apostrophe?

Apostrophe Examples

  • Twinkle, twinkle, little star, how I wonder what you are. ( …
  • O holy night! …
  • Then come, sweet death, and rid me of this grief. ( …
  • O, pardon me, thou bleeding piece of earth. ( …
  • Roll on, thou deep and dark blue Ocean – roll! ( …
  • Welcome, O life!

Is it Jones or Jones’s?

The Joneses is correct because it indicates more than one member of the family. The Jones’s indicates possession, as in the Jones’s home. Simply add an s to the end of your last name to indicate the message is coming from more than one family member. If your name ends in s or z, as in Jones or Juarez, add es.

Is it Williams or Williams’s?

Plural Is Not the Same As Possessive

First, the apostrophe makes the names possessive, and when we send greetings, they are from us, not from something we own. The names Smith and Williams would need to be in the possessive case only if the greeting were from Jane Smith’s hamster or John Williams’s goldfish.

Is it Davis’s or Davis?

According to Grammarbook.com, the nerds of the world will argue heatedly on the subject for eternity, but the most roundly accepted rule is to include the apostrophe, along with an extra “S.” (Davis’s rather than Davis’).

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Is it Chris’s or Chris?

Which is correct, Chris’s chair or Chris’ chair? James’s car or James’ car? Actually, both ways are correct. If a proper name ends with an s, you can add just the apostrophe or an apostrophe and an s.

Do you use an apostrophe for names?

Using Possessive Apostrophes. Use an apostrophe to indicate ownership by a proper noun. An apostrophe with an “s” after a proper noun indicates that the person, place or thing owns whatever noun follows his or her name. For example, “Mary’s lemons.” We know the lemons belong to Mary because of the ‘s.

Is it the Smith’s house or the Smiths house?

Original: I walked over to the Smith’s house. Correct : I walked over to the Smiths’ house. The house is occupied by the Smiths, not the Smith, so the name must be treated as a plural possessive.

When saying a family name is there an apostrophe?

To show possession of a whole family: First, add -es or -s to write the family’s last name in plural form. Then, add an apostrophe at the end to show possession. Right: Pip belongs to the Joneses. Pip is the Joneses’ cat.

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